Big Finishes

We aren’t going to sugar coat it: for as much fun as this project has been, some of the big decisions for the Little House have caused some anxiety. When I call it our dream house, in no small part am I referring to the countless times I’ve dreamed of things NOT coming together. Luckily, we have recently gotten some major hurdles out of the way!

The first of these has been the spiral staircase. We mentioned in a previous post that we had ordered one from a manufacturer in Tennessee, and it arrived last month as the ultimate DIY. Our craftsmen love a challenge, and they had the project almost finished up before we could even take any progress pics.  I think they were just as excited about it as we are!

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It is quite narrow; thank goodness our variance was approved! Our contractor then installed the remaining spindles, and it was a wrap:

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Another point of stress was our kitchen countertop. In a prior post we mentioned that we wanted to go with soapstone, and to help defray the costs of this choice we did our own “shipping”. We first sourced the sink we wanted: a farmhouse style, extra-wide, single-basin MONSTER. Internet searching revealed several stone shops specializing in soapstone sink construction outside of Philadelphia, PA. After sharking for the best price, last fall we took a day trip up through the Amish Country and collected our treasure, which fit perfectly in our salvaged cabinetry:

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For the countertops themselves we already had one piece of soapstone that we recycled from its former life in a Shenandoah County public school that we used to match with the sink. We knew that there was an old soapstone quarry outside of Charlottesville, Virginia, and using a daring leap of logic, we assumed that the public schools of the 1940s and 1950s would have sourced their materials as closely (read: cheaply) as possible. I dialed up the quarry, Alberene Soapstone Company, and they informed me that they are happy to sell their stone by the rectangle slab, but any custom cuts would be up to our installer. Luckily, our craftsmen had worked with soapstone before and felt up to the challenge! One day a few weeks ago I got the call that our slab was ready.  I hopped in one of the big farm trucks and headed to the quarry.

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After donning safety attire, we headed to pick up the slab.

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Unfortunately it was wrapped up to protect it from road debris during transit, and the anticipation of waiting to see the slab was killer, but well worth it!

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The craftsmen then were able to cut it down so our single solid slab extends out into the window sill and accommodates our sink:

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The recycled piece was also installed – a perfect match!

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One response

  1. Pingback: Helllloooo World! Meet the Little House’s Kitchen. | Living on the Edge(Hill)

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